Shakespeare is arguably the most widely taught author in the United States, but should he be?

Christina Torres has been teaching Shakespeare to her students for the past seven years. She loves Shakespeare, she’s read it, she’s performed it, and it’s an integral part of the lessons she crafts for her eighth-graders in Honolulu.

However, Torres recently opened up about why she feels guilty about assigning Shakespeare to her students.

“The guilt comes from wondering what would it mean for my students if my students had more access to literature from someone with a similar background,” says Torres.

Torres, who is half Mexican and half Filipino, says she did not get access to a Latino author until her junior year of high school.

“It was this huge revelation,” says Torres. “Here’s a Mexican writer, writing about things I understand! It was so overwhelming, and I feel a little sad that it did not happen to me until I was 16.”

Torres says she can’t help but feel guilty that she’s taking time in her curriculum that could be dedicated to other authors. After all, most schools teach Shakespeare through several grade levels.

Torres’s concerns don’t stop there. To hear our full interview with Torres listen to Episode 130 of the Class Dismissed Podcast on your favorite podcast app or iTunes.

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